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English & American Studies
Scholarly Editions: Presidential-Hist. Papers:
The Papers of George Washington
(University Press of Virginia)

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The Papers of George Washington

 

THE PAPERS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON
Philander D. Chase, Editor

Volumes from the Colonial Series, Revolutionary War Series, Confederation Series, and the Retirement Series are published by the University Press of Virginia. Send your orders to LEA Book distributors

See further descriptions of the project and volumes on our Letterpress Edition page.

The Papers of George Washington Revolutionary Series Volumes 1-9

Volume 1: ISBN 0-8139-1040-4 $35.00

1983

Volume 2: ISBN 0-8139-1102-8 $47.50

1983

Volume 3: ISBN 0-8139-1167-2 $47.50

1984

Volume 4: ISBN 0-8139-1307-1 $47.50

1984

Volume 5: ISBN 0-8139-1447-7 $67.50

1988

Volume 6: ISBN 0-8139-1538-4 $47.50

1988

Volume 7: ISBN 0-8139-1648-8 $55.00

1990

Volume 8: ISBN 0-8139-1787-5 $60.00

1993

Volume 9: ISBN 0-8139-1825-1 $60.00

1994

The Papers of George Washington Colonial Series Volumes 1-10 (complete)

Volume 1 ISBN 0-8139-0912-0 $40.00

1983

Volume 2 ISBN 0-8139-0923-6 $40.00

1983

Volume 3 ISBN 0-8139-1003-X $40.00

1984

Volume 4 ISBN 0-8139-1006-4 $40.00

1984

Volume 5 ISBN 0-8139-1144-3 $40.00

1988

Volume 6 ISBN 0-8139-1145-1 $42.00

1988

Volume 7 ISBN 0-8139-1236-9 $45.00

1990

Volume 8 ISBN 0-8139-1362-4 $47.50

1993

Volume 9 ISBN 0-8139-1465-5 $55.00

1994

Volume 10 ISBN 0-8139-1550-3 $55.00

1995


The Papers of George Washington C The Presidential Series1-9

Presidential Series

Vol. 1

ISBN 0-8139-1103-6 $37.50

1987

Vol. 2

ISBN 0-8139-1105-2 $37.50

1987

Vol. 3

ISBN 0-8139-1210-5 $42.50

1989

Vol. 4

ISBN 0-8139-1407-8 $65.00

1993

Vol. 5

ISBN 0-8139-1619-4 $47.50

1996

Vol. 6

ISBN 0-8139-1637-2 $57.50

1996

Vol. 7

ISBN 0-8139-1749-2 $60.00

1998

Vol. 8

ISBN 0-8139-1810-3 $55.00

1999

Vol. 9

ISBN 0-8139-1922-3 $62.50

2000

 


The Papers of George Washington Confederation Series Volumes 1-6 (complete)

 

Volume 1 ISBN 0-8139-1348-9 $47.50

1992

Volume 2 ISBN 0-8139-1349-7 $47.50

1992

Volume 3 ISBN 0-8139-1506-6 $47.50

1994

Volume 4 ISBN 0-8139-1560-0 $47.50

1995

Volume 5 ISBN 0-8139-1672-0 $47.50

1997

Volume 6 ISBN 0-8139-1684-4 $47.50

1997

The Papers of George Washington Retirement Series Volumes 1-4

Volume 1: ISBN 0-8139-1737-9 $55.00

1997

Volume 2: ISBN 0-8139-1762-X $55.00

1998

Volume 3: ISBN 0-8139-1838-3 $55.00

1999

Volume 4: ISBN 0-8139-1855-3 $55.00

1999




    The Papers of George Washington 
    Colonial Series Volumes 1-10 (complete)


The ten-volume Colonial Series, covering the years 1748-1775, takes the young Washington through his command of the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War and then focuses on his political and business activities as a Virginia planter during the fifteen years before the American Revolution.

Volume 1: 1748-August 1755;  ISBN 0-8139-0912-0 $40.00

Volume 2: August 1755-April 1756;  ISBN 0-8139-0923-6 $40.00

Volume 3: April-November 1756;  ISBN 0-8139-1003-X $40.00

Volume 4: November 1756-October 1757;  ISBN 0-8139-1006-4 $40.00

Volume 5: October 1757-September 175;  ISBN 0-8139-1144-3 $40.00

Volume 6: September 1758-December 1760;  ISBN 0-8139-1145-1 $42.00

Volume 7: January 1761-June 1767;  ISBN 0-8139-1236-9 $45.00

Volume 8: June 1767-December 1771;  ISBN 0-8139-1362-4 $47.50

Volume 9: January 1772-March 1774;  ISBN 0-8139-1465-5 $55.00

Volume 10: March 1774-June 1775;  ISBN 0-8139-1550-3 $55.00



The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series

The massive Revolutionary War Series (1775-1783) presents in documents and annotation the myriad military and political matters with which Washington dealt during the long war for American independence.

Volume 1: June-September 1775

Edited by Philander D. Chase

The publication of this volume marks the beginning of the second chronological series of The Papers of George Washington, a series which will constitute the first comprehensive edition of Washington's Revolutionary War papers.

Volume 1 of the Revolutionary War Series begins with Washington's address of 16 June 1775 accepting command of the Continental army and continues to the middle of September 1775. The focus of the volume is on Washington's initial effort to make an effective fighting force out of the green provincial army that he found besieging the city of Boston. His military letters and orders for these three months deal extensively with his reorganization of the army, the instituting of new administrative procedures and standards of discipline, the teaching of duties to both officers and men, and the measures taken to overcome the army's perplexing supply problems, most notably the alarming shortage of gunpowder. 

513 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1985
ISBN 0-8139-1040-4 $35.00


Volume 2: September-December 1775

Edited by Philander D. Chase

This volume covers the middle months of the siege of Boston when George Washington faced the delicate task of disbanding one army and recruiting another, all within musket shot of the British forces. Throughout the fall of 1775, assisted and sometimes thwarted by congressmen, New England officials, and fellow officers, Washington laid plans not merely to keep a besieging force around Boston and provide his men with winter necessities but also to remodel the army to make it more efficient and truly continental, intermixing officers and men without regard to their colonial identity. The numerous official letters Washington wrote and received during this period, his daily general orders, the records of his councils of war, and the minutes of his important October conference reveal a competent military administrator and a committed patriot attempting to create a professional American army which would transcend the narrow localism of the colonial past well in advance of the Declaration of Independence.

671 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1987
ISBN 0-8139-1102-8 $47.50


Volume 3: January-March 1776

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 3 covers the final months of the siege of Boston. It opens with General Washington proclaiming the commencement of the remodeled Continental army on New Year's Day 1776 and closes at the end of March as he prepares to depart for New York in the wake of the British evacuation of Boston.

615 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1988
ISBN 0-8139-1167-2 $47.50


Volume 4: April-June 1776

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 4 completes the documentary record of Washington's first year as commander in chief of the Continental army. It opens with his final preparations to leave Cambridge following the successful siege of Boston and concludes with news that General William Howe's British army was soon to arrive at New York, an event that would mark the beginning of the New York campaign. In the interim between campiagns, Washington established his headquarters at New York and began wrestling with the perplexing problems of defensing the strategically important corridor between New York and Canada formed by the Hudson River and Lake Champlain.

589 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1991
ISBN 0-8139-1307-1 $47.50

 

Volume 5: June-August 1776

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 5 covers the preliminary phase of the New York campaign, the period from mid-June to mid-August 1776 when the stage was set for Washington's greatest challenge yet as commander in chief of the Continental army. As the summer weeks passed, the British concentrated a massive military force in New York Harbor, bringing in thousands of Redcoats and German mercenaries backed by the guns of a large fleet. "The Powers of Despotism," Washington wrote in August, "are all combined against [America], and ready to strike their most decisive Stroke." Not knowing exactly where the stroke would fall, Washington wrote urgently to Congress and the states seeking reinforcements for the extensive lines that he was obliged to defend, while vigorously pushing forward construction of fortifcations and efforts to obstruct the Hudson River. At every opportunity he sought and read any piece of intelligence regarding the enemy force and its intentions.

739 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1993
ISBN 0-8139-1447-7 $67.50

 

Volume 6: August-October 1776

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 6 documents Washington's decisions and actions during the heart of the New York campaign--the period from late summer to early fall 1776 when his British opponent, General William Howe, took the offensive and outmaneuvered the American forces in and around New York City through a series of amphibious landings. Faced with an enemy superior in numbers, mobility, and discipline, Washington attempted to defend New York by placing his green troops behind fortifications on high ground and hoping that courage and patriotism would offset their lack of experience and training. That strategy failed at the Battle of Long Island on 27 August when Howe's army outflanked and routed a larger American force on the Heights of Guana. Two nights later Washington reunited his dangerously divided army by skillfully evacuating every man and most stores and equipment from Long Island to New York City.
651 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1994
ISBN 0-8139-1538-4 $47.50


Volume 7: October 1776-January 1777

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 7 documents the dramatic events of the New York campaign and the ensuing New Jersey campaign, a seemingly endless string of American reverses and retreats terminated by surprising victories at Trenton and Princeton. The volume opens with Washington's withdrawal of most of his army from Manhattan Island north to White Plains, where on 28 October British and Hessian troops routed the American right wing on Chatterton hill. Although Washington subsequently succeeded in blocking any further British advance to the north, his indecisiveness about ordering the evacuation of Fort Washington, the sole remaining American post on Manhattan Island, led to the disastrous loss of the fort's large garrison and many valuable stores when General Howe's forces overran it on 16 November.

599 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1996
ISBN 0-8139-1648-8 $55.00


Volume 8: January-March 1777

Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 8 documents Washington's first winter at Morristown. Situated in the hills of north central New Jersey, Morristown offered protection against the British army headquarters in New York City yet enabled Washington to annoy the principal enemy outposts at Newark, Perth Amboy, and New Brunswick. To discover Howe's intentions for the next campaign, Washington refined his intelligence-gathering network in New Jersey and New York during the winter months and kept a watchful, if distant, eye on the British armies in Rhode Island and Canada.
768 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1998
ISBN 0-8139-1787-5 $60.00

Volume 9: March-June 1777
Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 9 covers the spring of 1777, a period when Washington's resourcefulness and perseverance were tested as much as at any time during the war. Instead of opening the new campaign by taking the field with a reinvigorated Continental army as planned, Washington was obliged to spend much of his time pleading with state authorities to fill their recruiting quotas and with officers to bring in the men whom they had enlisted. He was further hampered by a high desertion rate, which he blamed on the failure of many officers to pay their men regularly.

720 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1998
ISBN 0-8139-1825-1 $60.00



The Papers of George Washington
Confederation Series

The six-volume Confederation Series (1784-1788) chronicles Washington's years at Mount Vernon after leaving the army and before becoming president, a time during which he developed his plantation at Mount Vernon and became increasingly involved in the political life of the new nation.

 

Volume 1: January-July 1784

This is the first volume of an eight-volume edition of Washington's papers in the Confederation period. Unlike the series devoted to Washington's Revolutionary War and presidential papers, the Confederation Series is composed almost entirely of personal letters and includes very few official documemts.
Documents printed in volume 1 reflect Washington's main concerns during the first months of peace. Many letters relate directly to his resumption of the management not only of his house and farms at Mount Vernon, as well as of his tenanted land in Frederick and Berkeley counties in Pennsylvania, but also of his vast holdings on the banks of the Great Kanawha and Ohio. Other letters deal with such things as the settlement of his military accounts, his activities as both president and determined reformer of the Society of the Cincinnati, and his preliminary notions about making the Potomac the connecting link between the East and the transmontane West.
Volume 1 ISBN 0-8139-1348-9 $47.50

Volume 2: July 1784-May 1785

Volume 2 documents Washington's emergence as the extraordinarily active leader of the move to open the upper reaches of the Potomac to navigation and to use it to tie the fast-settling West to the seaboard states. Besides documents relating to Washington's presidency of the Potomac River Company and to the routine management of his private affairs, there are letters dealing with such things as the famous Spanish jacks, the plight of both Patrick Henry and Nathanael Greene, histories by Jeremy Belknap and William Gordon, Lafayette's visit, William Byrd's letters, and David Humphreys's poetry.
Volume 2 ISBN 0-8139-1349-7 $47.50

Volume 3: May 1785-March 1786

Volume Three of the Confederation Series of The Papers of George Washington spans the year between May 1785 and April 1786, described by Washington's biographer Douglas Southall Freeman as a year of "drought and distraction." Washington spent most of these months at Mount Vernon, continuing to wrestle with the problems of restoring the plantation and his personal fortune after years of neglect while serving as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army -- efforts hampered by a long summer drought. During these months Washington was distracted by national affairs, particularly the impotence of the Confederation government, and by a constant stream of visitors. His principal concerns, however, were close to home.
Volume 3 ISBN 0-8139-1506-6 $47.50

Volume 4: April 1786-January 1787

Volume Four spans the critical period between April 1786 and January 1787. Washington spent all of this period at home at Mount Vernon, managing and improving his estate. Yet he remained a keen observer of the national scene, receiving a steady stream of reports on political developments from correspondents all over the new nation.
Volume 4 ISBN 0-8139-1560-0 $47.50

 

Volume 5: February-December 1787

The extensive correspondence regarding Shays' Rebellion and widespread alarm over the state of the Union continues in this volume, and there are the usual letters numbering in the hundreds which deal with his more personal concerns: farm and family, slave and tenant, tradesman and artisan. But the main focus of this volume is the Federal Convention in the summer of 1787 and the fight for ratification of the Constitution beginning in the fall of 1787. About these and other matters of importance Washington wrote to and heard from such Americans as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, George Mason, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, George Clinton, Gouverneur and Robert Morris, John Rutledge, William Moultrie, Christopher Gadsden, Noah Webster, Ezra Stiles, Charles Wilson Peale, and John Paul Jones; to and from such Europeans as Lafayette, Catherine Sawbridge, Macaulay Graham, Chastellux, Gardoqui, and La Luzerne. Of particular importance are Washington's exchanges regarding agricultural matters with Arthur Young, Thomas Peters, and a number of his fellow Virginia planters.
Volume 5 ISBN 0-8139-1672-0 $47.50

Volume 6: January-September 1788

Beginning with the decision made early in 1787 to attend the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in the summer, Washington's papers in volume 6 of the series reveal him as once again a public figure no longer standing outside and above the fray as he had been seeking to do with some success since leaving the army at the end of 1783. In the first nine months of this year Washington continued to give meticulous attention to his personal affairs at Mount Vernon as he had done before, but his correspondence, particularly that with James Madison, makes it clear that his overriding concern had become the ratification of the new Federal Constitution and that his mind was turning to the role he should, and must, play in establishing the new government.
Volume 6 ISBN 0-8139-1684-4 $47.50

 

The Papers of George Washington
Presidential Series


Volume 1: ISBN 0-8139-1103-6 $37.50
Volume 2: ISBN 0-8139-1105-2 $37.50
Volume 3: ISBN 0-8139-1210-5 $42.50
Volume 4: ISBN 0-8139-1407-8 $65.00
Volume 5: ISBN 0-8139-1619-4 $47.50
Volume 6: ISBN 0-8139-1637-2 $57.50
Volume 7: ISBN 0-8139-1749-2 $60.00
Volume 8: ISBN 0-8139-1810-3 $55.00
Volume 9: ISBN 0-8139-1922-3 $62.50<


The Presidential Series (1788-1797), when complete, will cover the eight precedent-setting years of Washington's presidency. These volumes include the public papers either written by Washington or presented to him during both of his administrations. Among the documents are Washington's messages to Congress, addresses from public and private bodies, applications for public office, letters of recommendation and documents concerned with diplomatic and Indian affairs. Also in these volumes are Washington's private papers, which include family letters, farm reports, letters to and from friends and acquaintanaces, and documents relating to the administration of his Mount Vernon plantation and management of the presidential household.



Volume 1: September 1788 - March 1789

Edited by W.W. Abbot

Volume 1 of the Presidential Series covers the months immediately before Washinton's election. Opening in September 1788, at the point when it was certain that the Constitution would be ratified, the documents trace the mounting public pressure upon Washington to agree to accept the presidency. His letters reveal poignantly his own misgivings about leaving Mount Vernon to return to public life. Well before he was offered the presidency he was deluged with applications for public offices. These letters are singularly revealing of economic and social disruption in the aftermath of the Revolution and of the political and social assumptions of Americans at the beginning of the new nation. Letters written to Washington during these months from all over the country report the gradual acceptance of the new government and the progress of the first federal elections in the states. His correspondence with foreign admirers is also extensive.

511 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1987
ISBN 0-8139-1103-6 $37.50

 

Volume 2:April-June 1789

Edited by W.W. Abbot

Volume 2 is concerned largely with Washington's inaugural jouney to New York and his initial activites as president upon his arrival. The documents, with annotations, chronicle the public adulation and the elaborate receptions and public addresses that the new president encountered along his route to the capital. His correspondence with friends and acquaintances at home and abroad concerns a wide range of subjects from politics to agricultural methods. His personal letters confirm his continuing need for money, his continued involvement in the affairs of family members, and his concern with his land interest in Virginia and on the frontier. As the volume closes Washington begins to gather information for his new administration in correspondence with major officers of government on matters affecting their departments.

533 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1987
ISBN 0-8139-1105-2 $37.50

Volume 3:June-September 1789

Edited by W.W. Abbot

Volume 3 covers most of the summer of 1789 and focuses primarily on the problems facing the new administration. Because of the president's serious illness during this period, a larger proportion of the documents than usual are letters and papers sent to Washington, including massive reports from the Board of Treasury describing the financial status of the new nation, detailed descriptions of Indian and military affairs from Henry Knox, and a plethora of applications for public office. The letters to Washington come from a cross section of Americans and present a rich resource on such divers topics as foreign affairs, overseas trade, and public attitudes toward the new government. Washington in these months was establishing the great departments of the federal government, and he devoted a considerable amount of his time to appointments and to the staffing of the new civil service.

651 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1989
ISBN 0-8139-1210-5 $42.50 

 

Volume 4: September 1789-January 1790

Edited by W.W. Abbot

Volume 4 covers the fall and early winter of 1789-90 and focuses on the problems facing the new administration. Many documents in this volume deal with the difficulties Washington encountered in his attempt to staff the federal judiciary and his fears that failure to attract viable candidates for the Supreme Court and the federal courts would damage the reputation of the new government. There is extensive correspondence dealing with the administration's unsuccessful attempt to negotiate a treaty with the Creek chief Alexander McGillivray and with the growing threat from Indian tribes in the Northwest. Applications for office continue to pour in, often illustrating the private difficulties and public aspirations of the Revolutionary generation. Letters to Washington come from a cross section of Americans and foreign dignitaries and present a rich resource on such diverse topics as foreign affairs, overseas trade, and public attitudes toward the new government. In October 1789 Washington undertook a trip through the New England states to attract support for his administration. 

636 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1993
ISBN 0-8139-1407-8 $65.00
 

 

Volume 5: January-June 1790

Edited by Dorothy Twohig

Volume 5 covers the first half of 1790 and focuses on Washington's continued concentration on the problems facing the new government. North Carolina had ratified the Constitution in late 1789, and Rhode Island held its ratifying convention in early 1790. Many documents in this volume reflect the president's concern with the establishment of ties to the federal government in both states, especially in the matter of appointments to the federal civil service. Also treated in detail in the volume are Washington's near-fatal illness in May 1790 and his difficult recovery. 

620 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1996
ISBN 0-8139-1619-4 $47.50
 

 

Volume 6: July-November 1790

Edited by Dorothy Twohig

During the period covered by volume 6, Washington's attention was devoted to several matters of great national significance. He signed the Residence and Funding Acts, authorizing a permanent new Federal City on the Potomac, establishing the seat of the federal government at Philadelphia until 1800, and creating a national debt by assuming the Revolutinary War debts of the states. Washington's official correspondence also shows his concern with Indian affairs, particularly his frustration with Brigadier General Josiah Harmar's punitive expedition in the Northwest Territory. Secretary of War Henry Knox's negotiations at New York with the southern Creeks loom large in the documents and annotation of early August 1790, which provide evidence of contemporary attitudes toward the Native American negotiators. Light is also shed on the intrigues of foreign agents on America's frontiers and in its capital as Spain and Great Britain appeared to drift toward war. 

758 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1996
ISBN 0-8139-1637-2 $57.50
 

 

Volume 7: December 1790-March 1791

Edited by Dorothy Twohig

Volume 7 of the series presents documents written during the final sessions of the First Congress, a period of intense activity for Washington and his administration. Between December 1790 and March 1791, Congress passed legislation that established a national bank and a dederal excise, incresed the size of the army, and provided for the admission of Vermont. Filling the offices created by these and other acts occupied much of Washington's attention; the excise service alone was one of the largest bureaucracies created during the Early Republic. The Indian war on the northwest frontier continued to be a major concern. Washington also devoted a large part of his time to the new Federal City on the Potomac. All of these activites were set against a background of increasing partisan division within the government, brought into high relief in February 1791 by the controversy over the bill to incorporate the Bank of the United states. George Wshington also devoted a part of his time during these months to planning his upcoming tour of the southern states. The volume closes on 21 March 1791, the day Washington left Philadelphia on the first leg of his triumphal Southern Tour.

649 pages 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth 1998
ISBN 0-8139-1749-2 $60.00 



Volume 8: March-September 1791

Mark Mastromarino, Editor
Jack D. Warren, Jr., Assistant Editor

In the period covered by volume 8 of the Presidential Series, the spring and summer of 1791, Washington completed a tour of the southern states, traveling almost 2,000 miles through Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. During his journey the heads of executive departments regularly reported to him from Philadelphia on preparations for a major military expedition against hostile Indian nations along the northwestern frontier, a boundary dispute with the British on Lake Champlain, the negotiation of American loans in Amsterdam, and other affairs of state. Washington was also informed of the controversy occasioned by Thomas Jefferson's sponsorship of the first American edition of Thomas Paine's The Rights of Man.

632 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 cloth
ISBN 0-8139-1810-3 $55.00

 

Volume 9: September 1791&endash;February 1792

Mark A. Mastromarino, Editor
Jack D. Warren, Assistant Editor

In the period covered by volume 9, the fall and winter of 1791-92, Washington was busy dealing with a host of issues. Over forty letters to and from Washington between November 1791 and February 1792 concern the problems arising from Pierre L'Enfant's high-handedness as designer of the Federal City, particularly his destruction of the house of Daniel Carroll of Duddington, and L'Enfant's insistence that he not take orders from the Commissioners for the District of Columbia but receive his authority from Washington directly. Washington's nomination in late December 1791 of Thomas Pinckney, Gouverneur Morris, and William Short as ministers at London, Paris, and the Hague, respectively, set off a firestorm of congressional controversy about the meaning of the "advice and consent" provision of the Constitution. Washington believed that the Senate was required either to accept or reject his nominees, while many congressional leaders, who disliked the idea of a fixed diplomatic establishment, argued that only Congress could decide where or if the United States was to appoint resident ministers abroad. 

672 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth
ISBN 0-8139-1922-3 $62.50 S
 

 

The Papers of George Washington
Retirement Series

The four-volume Retirement Series covers the interval between Washington's retirement from the presidency on 4 March 1797 and his death on 13 December 1799. Except for a trip to Philadelphia in 1798, Washington stuck close to home, only occasionally going from Mount Vernon into Alexandria or across the river to Georgetown and the new Federal City. The management and improvement of his farms at Mount Vernon were his major concern, and the pressing need for money forced him to give particular attention to the disposition of his large landholdings in the West. As Father of His Country he found himself not only entertaining a constant stream of visitors but also responding to a steady flow of letters from friends and strangers, foreign and domestic. From the start, senators, congressmen, Adams's cabinet members, and diplomats kept him informed of political developments. Washington's absence from the public stage, never much more than a fiction, came to an end in July 1798 when his growing alarm over French policy and the bitter divisions in the body politic arising out of it led him to accept command of the army, with the promise to take the field in case of a French invasion. And in 1799 Washington for the first time became deeply involved in partisan electoral politics.

 

Volume 1: March-December 1797

Edited by W.W. Abbot

During the first ten months of Washington's retirement, Washington was, as he said, busier than ever before, breaking in a new farm manager, repairing and refurbishing long-neglected buildings, hiring new overseers and a new gardener from Britain, and most difficult, and perhaps most important of all, getting a proper cook for Mrs. Washington.

608 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1997
ISBN 0-8139-1737-9 $55.00


Volume 2: January-September 1798

Edited by W.W. Abbot

In the early months of 1798,Washjngton's correspondence relates mostly to such private concerns as the management of his Mount Vernon estate, his tenants in Virginia, his lands in the West and in Pennsylvania, and the education of Washington Parke Custis and the marriage of Nelly Custis, but he continues to correspond with friends and strangers, the low and the mighty, throughout America and abroad. By late spring James Monroe's attacks and the furor over the XYZ affair are drawing Washington back into the political arena. The letters in the latter part of this volume are in large part written to and from Washington as the commander in chief of an army being raised to repulse a feared French invasion.

640 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1998
ISBN 0-8139-1762-X $55.00

 

Volume 3: September 1798-April 1799

Edited by W. W. Abbot and Edward G. Lengel

In the fall of 1798, Washington was immersed in the business of creating a military force to deal with the threat of an all-out war with France. A clash over Alexander Hamilton's rank in the army led Washington to contemplate resignation of his own post as commander in chief of the army, and the resolution of this affair brought no opportunity for rest as Washington engaged in the tedious task of finding officers for the new military formations. Despite all of this he still found time in the months that followed to build houses on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., seek the funds to put his financial affairs in order, oversee the marriage of Nelly Custis to Lawrence Lewis, and lament the divided state of American politics.

608 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1999
ISBN 0-8139-1838-3 $55.00


Volume 4: April-December 1799

Edited by W. W. Abbot

In the spring of 1799, the relaxation of tensions between France and the United States allowed Washington to redirect his attention to his personal affairs. He drew up a new will that summer and made arrangements for the breakup of the estate he had amassed in the course of his life; but he also kept his gaze on the future, drawing up extensive plans for farming at Mount Vernon in 1800, the management of which he planned to take on himself. Washington also supervised the compilation of a comprehensive list of his Mount Vernon slaves, while at the same time making plans for their eventual freedom. Washington died at Mount Vernon on 14 December, behaving with a courage that was witnessed by his friend and secretary, Tobias Lear, whose accounts of the event bring the volume to a close.

672 pages 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 cloth 1999
ISBN 0-8139-1855-3 $55.00









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